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Sep 23, 2019 - Zoltán Kovács

The latest attempt to impose the quotas

The interior ministers of Germany, France, Italy, and Malta gathered yesterday in Malta to revive the mandatory migrant relocation scheme, the one that some thought had already died a painful death.

The fact that the question of the migrant quota system is back on the EU’s agenda, Prime Minister Orbán warned in a speech on Saturday, is proof that left-wing politicians are still aggressively pushing a pro-immigration agenda.

And indeed, yesterday's mini-summit in the Maltese town of Birgu is set to introduce a new, updated version of the failed migrant quota system based on the backing in June of fifteen signatories to a so-called “European Solidarity Mechanism.” While the interior ministers of Germany, France, Italy, and Malta are conducting negotiations as we speak, what they don’t realize is that any form of quota system will encourage new masses of people to embark on a dangerous journey to Europe.

But, of course, the liberal, left wing couldn’t be bothered by such concerns. With every immigrant, they are, in fact, importing future voters who will help them undermine the parties that stand up to safeguard Europe’s current, Christian character. It’s a shame to see how Italy, the country whose government showed the world that immigration by sea can be stopped, fell in line with pro-migration forces on the western half of the continent.

As Foreign Minister Péter Szijjártó said in an interview with Kossuth Radio on Sunday, “Europe is entering a phase in which anti-migration governments could be subject to increased pressure and face attempts to cram mandatory migrant quotas down the throats of European countries.” Apparently, this is what’s been happening yesterday.

However, the government of Prime Minister Viktor Orbán offers a different path, highlighting that “Hungary is ready to help Italy in whatever it can.” We can help in protecting the borders or even taking the migrants back to where they came from. But we won’t assist with any form of migrant quota system or follow blindly the ideology of pro-migration parties that preach about the coming of a “higher-quality society.” Neither will Hungary take in immigrants from simply anywhere; that’s an absolute no-go.

The policy of the new Italian government is exactly opposite to the one pursued by Former Minister of Interior Matteo Salvini, so it’s also diametrically opposed to the Hungarian position – perhaps unsurprisingly so, as Italy has a pro-migration, leftist government. Hungary, on the other hand, will reject pressure from any European country that aims to pressure Hungary into letting illegal immigrants cross its borders.