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Nov 16, 2018

EU credit cards for migrants raises many questions

“It is inconceivable for a citizen of the European Union not to have to identify themselves when they go into the bank, but an anonymous card does not conform to this condition," Zoltán Kovács said

Following the shock revelation that the European Union supplies tens of thousands of credit cards to migrants, Hungary's government spokesman says the issue raises many questions.

Zoltán Kovács said questions need to be asked over who checks the data, what the money is used for, and how criminals and people who are possibly linked to terrorism are filtered out.

Speaking on M1 national television, Kovács spoke about the fact that although these bank cards are in theory only part of a program that is running in Greece, they are nevertheless appearing in neighboring countries along the Western Balkan migration route.

“It is inconceivable for a citizen of the European Union not to have to identify themselves when they go into the bank, but an anonymous card does not conform to this condition," he pointed out.

“We can see a system in operation, and the plan seems to be to bring as many people as possible into Europe," he said. “It is a confrontation between the intent to organize immigration and the intent to stop immigration," he stressed.

The spokesman asked why is there a proposal on the table at all concerning the fact that people far away from Europe could apply for a visa that would enable people who want to come here to submit the documents required to examine their request here in Europe?

“According to the government’s standpoint, all problems should be handled where they arose, if possible," he highlighted. “Only people whose cases have already been decided on should be able to set foot in Europe," Kovács added.

Meanwhile, the head of the Prime Minister’s Office said the government will ask the EU and the United Nations for clarification concerning “unclear circumstances” surrounding debit cards issued to migrants.

Gergely Gulyás called it “unacceptable” that migrants were to be granted debit cards without personal identification, saying it posed risks in terms of fighting terrorism, people smuggling and money laundering. He also welcomed the European Parliament’s recent rejection of the introduction of a European “humanitarian visa system”.