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Jul 16, 2018

FM: Countries rejecting the UN’s planned Global Compact for Migration could be “best off”

The migration pack fails to address the rights of people who simply strive to live in their home countries in peace and stability

The foreign minister has said that countries rejecting the UN’s planned Global Compact for Migration could be “best off”. 

Péter Szijjártó, minister of Foreign Affairs and Trade, argued that the concept of the draft posed serious risks as “it defines migration as a fundamental human right” and “could be taken by anyone as an invitation”. 

The minister added that it fails to address the rights of people who simply strive to live in their home countries in peace and stability. 

Minister Szijjártó noted that the United States had announced its withdrawal from the pact in December 2017, adding that other countries such as Singapore and Australia had also stated concern and dissatisfaction with the compact. 

The foreign minister said he would propose to the government next week to withdraw from the package’s approval process and “make it clear that it does not consider any of its provisions as binding”. 

The government will continue to protect Hungary and the Hungarian people and will clearly state its rejection of documents that require opposite measures.

Meanwhile, György Bakondi reiterated the sentiments that Hungary has no choice but to leave the pact. 

He added that in theory the pact is not mandatory, but it may in the future constitute a point of reference. 

According to the chief security advisor, the greatest danger of the UN pact is that “the message is an invitation” for migrants to set out.

Bakondi observed that the package of proposals has elements that can be supported, such as the struggle against people smugglers. 

However, the fact that migration is defined as a fundamental human right is “in stark contrast to” the will of the Hungarian government and some three million Hungarian people as stated in national consultations as well as at the latest parliamentary elections.