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Sep 29, 2020

FM: Hungary and Poland to set up a joint institute for comparative law

The foreign minister said that the “patriotic” policies of the two cabinets, which he said were “based on Christian values and prioritise national interests”, were often unacceptable to “the international liberal mainstream… continually attacking the two countries”.

 

The foreign minister has announced that Hungary and Poland will set up a joint institute for comparative law to help joint efforts against the “suppression of opinions by liberal ideology”.

After meeting Polish counterpart Zbigniew Rau, Péter Szijjártó, Minister of Foreign Affairs and Trade, said that the “patriotic” policies of the two cabinets, which he said were “based on Christian values and prioritise national interests”, were often unacceptable to “the international liberal mainstream… continually attacking the two countries”. The new institute will “accumulate the necessary legal certainty, basis and knowledge against the suppression of opinions by liberal ideology”, he added. Poland is not only a friend but also a brother-in-arms of Hungary and its closest ally in Europe, the minister said.

Hungary’s ability to enforce the interests of its foreign policy depends greatly on the strength of the Visegrad Group as well as the strength of the Hungarian-Polish alliance, he said, adding that strengthening those relationships was therefore always a key part of the country’s foreign policy. The V4 comprising the Czech Republic, Hungary, Poland and Slovakia is today the closest and most effective alliance within the European Union, Minister Szijjártó said.

Hungary and Poland reject the European Commission’s new migration pact, the minister said, arguing that it was a “pro-migration” document that would encourage more and more would-be migrants to set off for Europe and still contained a “rebranded” migrant quota. “That’s still a red line,” Minister Szijjártó said. “It’s completely unacceptable for us.” He added that the V4 would continue to pursue the policies that had so far been successful in stopping immigration.

Photo credit: Mandiner