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Sep 26, 2019

FM: UN law stokes migration

“There is no such thing as people waking up one morning with the decision that they want to live in another country, and in order to do so will breach dozens of countries and their sovereignty,” Minister Szíjjártó said.

The Foreign Minister has said the UN's interpretation of the law is encouraging migration.

Ahead of a UN conference on peace processes in Africa, Péter Szíjjártó, Minister of Foreign Affairs and Trade, told MTI that Europe is under renewed migration pressure, which also includes a pickup in organized crime where people smuggling and terrorist networks use the migration wave to infiltrate the continent.

Minister Szíjjártó said that within the UN there is an “acrimonious, politicized debate about what exactly constitutes basic human rights”. He said that if one is to take international law literally, there is no such thing as a fundamental right to migration.

“There is no such thing as people waking up one morning with the decision that they want to live in another country, and in order to do so will breach dozens of countries and their sovereignty,” Minister Szíjjártó said.

There are, however, paragraphs that say all people around the world have a right to live in peace and quiet in their own countries. Instead of asserting this right, the UN is stoking migration, which also has severe security implications.

Minister Szíjjártó added that Hungary is one of the front-runners when it comes to upholding international law and defending its citizens, while at the same time doing its best to bring aid to those who need it most. He said last year alone Hungary had spent HUF 7 billion (EUR 21 million) on programs that help African people to have more liveable conditions at home.

Photo credit: kormany.hu