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Dec 04, 2019

Forbes: Hungary's approach to helping persecuted Christians is "unique" and one not replicated elsewhere

According to Forbes, Hungary recognizes that the attacks on Christians around the world are not a matter of coincidence, but constitute a global phenomenon that will not cease on its own.

Forbes has highlighted how Hungary's approach to helping persecuted Christians around the globe is "unique" and one not replicated elsewhere.

The report states that Hungary recognizes that attacks on Christians around the world are not a matter of coincidence, but constitute a global phenomenon that will not cease on its own.

As a result, the Hungarian government has established the State Secretariat for the Aid of the Persecuted Christians, which has been tasked with providing direct support for the persecuted Christian communities and raising domestic and international political and public awareness of the 21st century.

The report continues that the government of Hungary has also established the Helps program to provide a broad range of humanitarian services to Christians persecuted for their religion in many countries in the Middle East and Africa. The scope of their work continues to expand geographically.

The article points out that some of the main achievements of Hungary Helps are rebuilding a whole village in the Nineveh Plains of Northern Iraq to ensure that lawful homeowners can return to their homes, providing scholarships to students to continue their education in. Hungary, building schools, funding hospitals and more. It is the only state-run program of its kind.

In November 2019, for the second time, Hungary organized an international conference on Christian persecution, uniting over 700 people from all over the world, state leaders, religious leaders, survivors, experts and civil society, to engage with the issue and seek further approaches to address it. 

The piece concludes that the tailored approach taken by Hungary is a unique one and one that is not replicated elsewhere.

Read the full article here.

Photo credit: Hungary Helps