articleimg-1
May 22, 2017

Hungarian astronomers discover new moon

Csaba Kiss, along with his research team from the Hungarian Science Academy (MTA), had their discovery proven by data collected from Hubble and other observatories

In a groundbreaking find, Hungarian astronomers from the Hungarian Science Academy (MTA) have stumbled upon a new moon revolving around a dwarf planet.

Csaba Kiss, along with his research team, had their discovery proven by data collected from Hubble and other observatories.

According to index.hu, the solar system’s third biggest dwarf planet now has a confirmed new moon, and the discovery could be helpful in making a model of how the Solar system was created.

Sources say that Kiss and his team were observing the Kuiper belt (over Neptune’s course) along with the Kepler space observatory when they noticed that the 2007 OR10 dwarf planet was revolving on its spindle too slowly.

It was determined that a 240-400 km in diameter moon was orbiting an approximate 1,500 km diameter dwarf planet.

“The fact that – with the exception of the Sedna – we’ve found moons orbiting all of the dwarf planets point to the fact that these orbs came into being billions of years ago, and there were more frequent clashes. This puts strong constraints on the orb-creational models," Kiss said.