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Jun 15, 2017

Hungarian government strongly refutes Martin Schulz’s criticisms of Hungary’s stance on immigration

Hungary is currently engaged in litigation in relation to the EU migrant quota decision, with Slovakia, Poland and others on side. The quota scheme is “unfair, unlawful and impracticable"

The Hungarian government has strongly refuted Martin Schulz’s criticisms of Hungary’s stance on immigration.

Government Spokesperson Zoltán Kovács responded to Schulz’s recent comments that if elected as chancellor of Germany, he will push for the EU to cut subsidies to countries that refuse refugees.

Politico reported that Schulz said in reference to Prime Minister Viktor Orbán that “when it comes to agricultural policy, it’s all ‘Yes, please.’ When it comes to subsidies, it’s all ‘Yes, please.’ And when it comes to solidarity in refugee policy, it’s ‘No, thank you’ — that’s not acceptable."

Kovács said that he “attempts to embroil Hungary in the German internal political campaign”, and evidently “seeks to use it to his political advantage”.

The spokesperson pointed out that statements such as this testify to the “double standards” which exist in the heads of western European politicians regarding Hungary.

The Hungarian position related to illegal migration “has nothing to do with” the cohesion funds, that is the development funds of the European Union, Kovács pointed out. These are two completely different systems existing on different foundations and independently from each other, and connecting them together is nothing short of “political blackmail” to which Hungary will not yield, he said.

Hungary has consistently maintained its position on illegal migration, and the situation is not a refugee crisis but a migrant crisis, he added. “Tens and hundreds of thousands, in fact, millions are making their way towards Europe, abusing the mentality which Martin Schulz’s manifestations reflect,” Kovács said.

Hungary is currently engaged in litigation in relation to the EU migrant quota decision, with Slovakia, Poland and others on side. The quota scheme is “unfair, unlawful and impracticable,” he concluded.