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Aug 06, 2019

Hungarian scientist Antal Berényi may have found a cure for epilepsy

The first prototype has just been finalized, but the epilepsy machine is due to undergo some further developments and a testing phase before being launched to the public.

A new invention by Hungarian scientist Antal Berényi is set to change the future of epilepsy treatments.

Developed by Berényi and his team, the gadget works akin to a pacemaker. Constantly measuring brain activity, it exerts pressure on the skull-embedded electrodes.

The first prototype has just been finalized, but the epilepsy machine is due to undergo some further developments. It will have to undergo a course of lab experiments–involving human subjects–before it will be launched publicly.

Berényi began his career as a researcher at New York University. Citing this as his alma mater, the scientist stresses that the institute enabled and encouraged him to start working on issues relating to cognitive activity. Berényi eventually returned home in Hungary in 2013, splitting his time between three, equally important scientific projects.

Next, Berényi will focus on electrotherapy intended to improve the malfunctions of the cognitive tissue-interface, offering a new solution to chronic, terminal neuro-psychiatric illnesses that affect about 100 million Europeans every year.

Photo credit: nepszava.hu