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Sep 19, 2017

Hungary does not agree with ECJ ruling over migrant quotas, but recognizes it says government spokesperson

Zoltán Kovács said that from several perspectives Hungary's "legal and political battle against the EU’s refugee quotas are only just beginning"

The Hungarian government recognizes the ruling of the European Court of Justice over migrant quotas, but does not agree with it, says the country's government spokesperson.

Zoltán Kovács said that from several perspectives Hungary's "legal and political battle against the EU’s refugee quotas are only just beginning".

“With relation to the migration crisis, Hungary is one of very few EU member states to have done everything possible in the interests of fulfilling its obligations," Kovács stressed during a press conference in Brussels.

“Hungary has a clean conscience. We can see that Hungarian border security measures are working. It has been proven that the Hungarian proposals are viable," he added.

“The Hungarian government rejects this new, one-sided and biased idea of solidarity, which reduces the definition of the concept solely to participation in the quota system," he said.

He also pointed out that Hungary has spent 883 million euros on border protection over the past two years, with which it has not only defending itself, but also protecting other countries such as Austria and Germany.

“This is just the extraordinary expenditure, and although it may include the cost of constructing the border security fence, this is by no means the majority of the amount, and accordingly Hungary expects the other member states and the EU’s institutions to show solidarity," he added.

“It would also be in the European Union’s interests to display a sober attitude in view of the fact that the migration situation continues to be unsustainable," Kovács said.

“It is incomprehensible why the EU wants to force something that several countries clearly reject onto its member states. We need decision-making based on consensus, and rational decisions that can be implemented," he concluded.