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May 18, 2017

Hungary is ready to battle it out with Brussels over Article 7 proceedings

János Lázár, head of the Prime Minister’s Office, has said that the latest developments will only bring Hungarians closer together and ensure that Hungary will fight for its survival

Hungary has said that it will contiune its long and unnecessarily drawn out battle with Brussels after the European Parliament initiated Article 7 proceedings against the nation yesterday.

János Lázár, head of the Prime Minister’s Office, has said that the latest developments will only bring Hungarians closer together and ensure that Hungary will fight for its survival.

One of the principal issues of the next general election will be to determine how much Hungary will have in deciding its own fate. He added that there are more and more events which call for increased national unity, and it is therefore important that more than the already submitted 1.5 million people answer the national consultation questionnaire.

Lázár added that new law on higher education meets European norms, therefore Hungary is ready to undergo all assessments and was surprised by the latest developments.

The minister said that the draft resolution proposing Article 7 represented a “threat and an attempt to pressurize” Hungary.

It will be the umpteenth assessment by the EP about Hungary so “there is nothing new about it," he said.

He added that he believed all universities operating in Hungary should be affected by equal regulations, including US financier George Soros’s Central European University. Soros has a strong lobby in Brussels and he has “huge influence on the left wing,” Lázár said. Hungary will not yield to pressure, he added.

Lázár said that the EP passed judgment on Hungary “in a way that suits George Soros’ taste” because Hungary wants to withdraw the privileges of the Soros university. Those that voted for the stricter resolution voted against Hungary and “we cannot accept that," he said.

The EP’s resolution calls on the Hungarian government to suspend the deadlines included in the new higher education bill and undertake the obligation that the CEU can stay in Budapest as a free institution.

In regards to immigration, Lázár said that the problems should not be solved within European boundaries, but locally, from where they originate. Hungary wishes to spend its money on Hungarian people, rather than on relocated migrants, he concluded.