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Nov 03, 2017

Hungary tries to save Christian cross earmarked for removal by French authorities

“Is it really true that in 21st century Europe we are removing a Christian symbol? Is everyone entitled to religious freedom except for Christians?," Minister Szijjártó asked, adding that these were pivotal issues that affected the fate of the continent

The government has said that it would like to pay the expenses of transporting a cross to Hungary that is earmarked for removal from a statue of Pope John Paul II in the town of Ploërmel, France.

The Hungarian government is willing to undertake any administrative burdens if the leaders of the French settlement consent to it, Péter Szijjártó, minister of Foreign Affairs and Trade, said.

The foreign ministry has contacted the local government of the small town in Brittany via the Hungarian Embassy in Paris, but had received no reply so far, adding that the cross would be received by the Saint Benedict Secondary and High School.

The minister did not wish to comment on the Council of State’s decision to remove the cross, but said that all decisions that cite tolerance in a hypocritical manner to suppress Christianity, and which order the removal of Christian symbols, are “hugely damaging” with regard to the future of Europe.

According to the minister, “astounding self-deprecation” aimed at suppressing Christianity goes against Europe’s interests. “Such measures must be regarded as attempts to do away with the continent’s civilisation and culture," he said.

“These days we are seeing the emergence of issues that nobody previously thought could ever emerge, because irrespective of religious denomination nobody can dispute the fact that Christianity is a determining part of European culture”. 

“Is it really true that in 21st century Europe we are removing a Christian symbol? Is everyone entitled to religious freedom except for Christians?," Minister Szijjártó asked, adding that these were pivotal issues that affected the fate of the continent.

The minister highlighted the fact that Europe’s Christian values must be preserved, and that people who arrive in Europe must accept and respect local laws and the traditions of the people who live here.

According to Minister Szijjártó, illegal immigration is endangering Europe’s Christian nature, because becoming an immigrant country means that new arrivals will eventually want to overwrite local regulations.