articleimg-1
Jul 12, 2018

Hungary's pro-family culture is "winding back the clock" on demographic decline

A leading study suggests that Hungary's pro-family culture has resulted in a rising fertility rate for married women

The demographic problem in Hungary appears to be improving, according to a report by Breibart.

A leading study suggests that Hungary's pro-family culture has resulted in a rising fertility rate for married women, which is "winding back the clock" on demographic decline.

“The country is not just experiencing a fertility spike; Hungary is winding back the clock on much of the fertility and family-structure transition that demographers have long considered inevitable,” writes the author of “Is Hungary Experiencing a Policy-Induced Baby Boom?” from the Institute for Family Studies.

“That’s unusual,” author Lyman Stone wrote, “as most countries around the world are currently experiencing stable or falling fertility, especially in Europe.”

The report suggests that fiscal implications — such as subsidies for married couples buying homes, a change in tax deductions for children, and a growing economy — play a part in the increased fertility rate, along with cultural policies.

The author points to Hungary’s pro-family constitution adopted in 2011 which stated that “we believe that our children and grandchildren will make Hungary great again,” and which defends “the institution of marriage as the union of a man and a woman… and the family as the basis of the nation’s survival.”

Stone also pointed to the Hungarian “marriage boom”, which “starting around 2012, but really taking off in 2015 and 2016″ saw women in Hungary becoming more likely to get married — particularly at a younger age which offers a wider window for natural fertility (which is below the age of 35).

“And marriage makes childbearing much more likely among the vast majority of women who desire to have kids,” he added.

Read more here.