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Feb 12, 2018

Whether or not Hungary will become an “immigrant country” is at stake in the general election, says state secretary

“Several national consultation surveys and a referendum have demonstrated beyond doubt that Hungarians don’t even want to hear about this. And the government must heed the will of the Hungarian people,” Csaba Dömötör said

What's at stake in the upcoming general election is the question of whether Hungary will become an “immigrant country,” according to a senior official.

Csaba Dömötör, parliamentary state secretary in the Cabinet Office of the Prime Minister, said the Belgian prime minister’s recent “threat” in connection with migrant quotas highlighted the issue.

“Too many people have fought for our culture and freedom for us to give them up now,” Dömötör said.

Dömötör said the Belgian prime minister’s comments proved that the EU plans to start implementing its mandatory migrant relocation scheme by the summer. He said the EU wanted to enforce the scheme “over the heads of the Visegrád Group countries”.

He added that this means that the EU “is applying a new level of pressure”, arguing that Brussels was now “openly threatening the V4 countries and those that don’t want to hear about migrant quotas”.

Dömötör added that the debate in the EU about migrant quotas had now entered a critical phase. The proposal currently on the agenda is far more dangerous [than the previous one] because it would introduce a migrant relocation scheme without an upper limit, he insisted. “This is out of the question,” he added.

“Several national consultation surveys and a referendum have demonstrated beyond doubt that Hungarians don’t even want to hear about this. And the government must heed the will of the Hungarian people,” he said.

Dömötör added that Hungary’s only chance to kill the migrant quota scheme would come in the European Council, arguing that the European Parliament had already approved it and the European Council was looking to follow suit.

Speaking of the UN’s draft document on migration, Dömötör said one of the many reasons why the document was dangerous, was that it viewed the right to resettlement as a basic right. According to the document, people could live wherever they choose and the countries of the world would just have to accept this, he added.